Not all measures you take for climate have a direct CO₂ reduction. Yet they are all important. How do we define them in FutureproofedCities? We structure the tool through sectors, measures and actions.

Sectors

1. Mitigation

You will typically organise your climate action plan per sector: agriculture, tertiary, households, industry, government, municipal fleet, street lighting, public transport, private transport, local production of heat/cold and local production of electricity. These sectors are SE(C)AP compatible so you can use the information from FPC as input in the mitigation plan.

Example: Households.

2. Adaptation

You will also organise your adaptation action plan for each impact sector, but these are slightly different: buildings, transport, energy, water, waste, land use planning, agriculture and forestry, environment and biodiversity, health, civil protection and emergency situations and tourism. These sectors are SE(C)AP compatible in order to be able to use the information from FPC as input in the adaptation plan.

Example: Water.

Measures

1. Mitigation

Measures result in financial and CO₂ savings per sector. Each measure is calculated on the basis of a unit (e.g. number of households, number of MWh). The financial savings, investment and CO₂ savings are calculated per unit, so that you know the total savings in the final year of your measure. All these data can be adjusted if you have your own (more accurate) data.

Example: Installing solar panels for Households.

2. Adaptation

Measures result in financial savings and improved adaptation per sector. Each measure is linked to a risk, a climate hazard that helps reduce the measure. They have also been calculated using a unit (e.g. number of trees, number of km). The financial savings and investment are calculated per unit, so that you know the total savings in the final year of your measure. All these data can be adjusted if you have your own (more accurate) data.

Example: Building an embankment next to the sea.

Actions

Actions are smaller and support one or more measures, but do not necessarily result in a direct CO₂ reduction or adaptation improvement. You can give actions a result (e.g. number of people present at an event, number of participants in a group purchase). Since actions are often more concrete for citizens, we have put them central on the public page.

Example: Organising a group purchase or info session about solar panels or a future embankment.

The most important differences between measures and actions

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